Exam Reads

This page is for posterity. In Fall 2012 I took my comprehensive exam for my Master’s program. It’s one of the steps on the way to an MA. I passed the exam in November 2012 and graduated with a Master’s in English with a concentration in Rhetoric & Composition in May 2013.

Links take you to recaps (most are Tweets, a few are Posts).

Pre-1500 (completed July 7, 2012)

1500-1600

1600-1700

  • John Donne, “The Flea,” “Song” (“Go and catch a falling star”), “The Canonization,” “A Nocturnal upon St. Lucy’s Day,” “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning,” “A Lecture upon the Shadow,” “Twickenham Garden,” Elegy 19 (“To His Mistress Going to Bed”), Holy Sonnets 10 (“Death Be Not Proud”), 14 (“Batter my heart”), and 17 (“Since she whom I loved”), “Good Friday, 1613. Riding Westward,” “Meditation 17” (from Devotions upon Emergent Occasions)
  • John Milton, Paradise Lost
  • a) Aphra Behn, Oroonoko, The Rover
    b) Margaret Cavendish, Blazing World
  • a) Anne Bradstreet, “The Prologue,” “The Flesh and the Spirit,” “The Author to Her Book,” “A Letter to Her Husband, Absent upon Public Employment,” “In Reference to Her Children,” “ In Memory of . . . Elizabeth Bradstreet,” “Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House July 10th, 1666”
    b) Mary Rowlandson, A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (including “Preface to the Reader”)

1700-1800

  • Henry Fielding, Tom Jones
  • Alexander Pope, “The Rape of the Lock,” “An Essay on Criticism,” “An Essay on Man,” “Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot”
  • a) Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself
    b) Phillis Wheatley, “On the Death of . . . George Whitefield,” “On Being Brought from Africa to America,” “To the University of Cambridge, in New England,” “To S.M., a Young African Painter,” Letter to Rev. Samson Occom (Feb. 11, 1774)
    c) Jupiter Hammon, “An Address to Miss Phillis Wheatly [sic]”
  • a) Thomas Gray, “Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College,” “Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Goldfishes,” “Elegy Written in a Country Church-Yard,” “The Fatal Sisters”
    b) Robert Burns, “The Cotter’s Saturday Night,” “To a Mouse,” “Holy Willie’s Prayer,” “Epistle to John Lapraik”

1800-1850

  • Herman Melville, Moby-Dick; or The Whale
  • a) Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
    b) Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life a Slave Girl
    c) Sojourner Truth, “Ar’n’t I a Woman? Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio, 1851”
    d) Frances E. W. Harper, “Ethiopia,” “An Appeal to my Country Women,” “Woman’s Political Future.”
  • William Wordsworth, The Prelude, Books I & XI, 1805 (not 1850) [Recommended text: Norton Critical Edition The Prelude, 1799, 1805, 1850 ed. by Jonathan Wordsworth], “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey,” “Michael,” “Resolution and Independence,” “The Ruined Cottage,” Preface to Lyrical Ballads (1802)
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne, “Young Goodman Brown,” “The Minister’s Black Veil,” “My Kinsman, Major Molineux,” “The Birth-Mark,” “Rappaccini’s Daughter”

1850-1915

  • a) Walt Whitman, “Song of Myself,” “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry,” “Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking,” “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d,” “O Captain! My Captain!” “In Paths Untrodden,” “When I Heard at the Close of the Day”
    b) Emily Dickinson, [Recommended Text: The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, ed. Thomas H. Johnson. Little, Brown, 1955] “Why—do they shut Me out of Heaven?” (Poem 248), “Over the fence—” (251), “I felt a Funeral, in my Brain” (280), “Some keep the Sabbath going to church—” (324) “After great pain a formal feeling comes—” (341) “Much Madness is divinest Sense” (435), “I was the slightest in the House—” (486), “They shut me up in Prose—” (613), “I dwell in Possibility—” (657)
  • Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • George Eliot, Middlemarch
  • Henry James, “Daisy Miller,” “The Beast in the Jungle,” “Turn of the Screw”

1915-1945

  • T. S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” “Tradition and the Individual Talent,” The Waste Land
  • Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse
  • Américo Paredes, George Washington Gómez
  • William Butler Yeats, “The Second Coming,” “Leda and the Swan,” “Among School Children,” “Lapis Lazuli,” “Under Ben Bulben,” “Byzantium,” “Sailing to Byzantium”

1945-1968

  • Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot
  • Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man
  • a) Sylvia Plath, “Morning Song,” “Lady Lazarus,” “Daddy,” “Blackberrying,” “The Colossus,” “The Applicant,” “Cut,” and “The Arrival of the Bee Box”
    b) Theodore Roethke, “The Waking,” “I Knew a Woman,” “In a Dark Time,” “Root Cellar,” “My Papa’s Waltz”
  • Flannery O’Connor, “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” “Good Country People,” “Everything That Rises Must Converge,” “The Artificial Nigger”

1969-present

  • Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon
  • a) Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza, 2nd ed., Introduction and Chapters 1-7
    b) Lorna Dee Cervantes, from Emplumada, “Uncle’s First Rabbit,” “Cannery Town in August,” “Beneath the Shadow of the Freeway,” “For Virginia Chavez,” “Poem for the Young Man…,”
    c) Cherríe Moraga, From The Last Generation “Queer Aztlán: the Re-formation of Chicano Tribe”; From: Loving in the War Years, Expanded 2nd ed., “Loving in the War Years,” “La Güera,” “A Long Line of Vendidas,” “Looking for the Insatiable Woman,” and “Out of our Revolutionary Minds Toward a Pedagogy of Revolt”
  • Tomás Rivera, And the Earth Did Not Devour Him

Rhetoric and Composition

Theory

  • Plato, Phaedrus, in Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg, eds. The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present. 2nd ed. Boston/St. Martin’s, 2001.
    Aristotle, from Rhetoric, in Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg, eds. The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present. 2nd ed. Boston/St. Martin’s, 2001.
    Cicero, from De Oratory Book I, in Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg, eds. The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present. 2nd ed. Boston/St. Martin’s, 2001.
  • James Berlin, “Rhetoric and Ideology in the Writing Class,” Victor Villanueva, ed. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory, 2nd ed. Urbana/NCTE, 2003.
    Mike Rose, “The Language of Exclusion: Writing Instruction at the University,” Victor Villanueva, ed. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory, 2nd ed. Urbana/NCTE, 2003.
    Jacqueline Jones Royster, “A View from the Bridge: Afrafeminist Ideologies and Rhetorical Studies,” in Feminism and Composition: A Critical Sourcebook, Gesa E. Kirsch, et al., eds. Boston/St. Martin’s, 2003.
    Shirley Wilson Logan, “’When and Where I Enter’: Race, Gender, and Composition Studies,” in Feminism and Composition: A Critical Sourcebook, Gesa E. Kirsch, et al., eds. Boston/St. Martin’s, 2003.
  • Gee, James Paul, “What is Literacy?” Teaching and Learning 2 (1987): 3-11.
    Clifford, John. “The Subject is Discourse.” Contending with Words: Composition and Rhetoric in a Postmodern Age. New York: Modern Language Association, 1991.
    Paré, Anthony. “Genre and Identity: Individuals, Institutions, and Ideology”. The Rhetoric and Ideology of Genre. Ed. Richard Coe, Lorelei Lingard, and Tatiana Teslenko. Cresskill: Hampton P, 2002. 57-72.

Practice

  • Nancy Sommers, “Revision Strategies of Student Writers and Experienced Adult Writers,” Victor Villanueva, ed. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory, 2nd ed. Urbana/NCTE, 2003.
    Lisa Ede and Andrea Lunsford, “Audience Addressed/Audience Invoked: The Role of Audience in Composition Theory and Pedagogy,” Victor Villanueva, ed. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory, 2nd ed. Urbana/NCTE, 2003.
    Patrick Hartwell, “Grammar, Grammars, and the Teaching of Grammar,” Victor Villanueva, ed. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory, 2nd ed. Urbana/NCTE, 2003.
    Chris Anson, “Distant Voices: Teaching and Writing in a Culture of Technology,” Victor Villanueva, ed. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory, 2nd ed. Urbana/NCTE, 2003.
  • Mikhail Bakhtin, from Marxism and the Philosophy of Language, in Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg, eds. The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present. 2nd ed. Boston/St. Martin’s, 2001.
    Kenneth Burke, from A Rhetoric of Motives, in Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg, eds. The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present. 2nd ed. Boston/St. Martin’s, 2001.
    Michel Foucault, from The Order of Discourse, in Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg, eds. The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present. 2nd ed. Boston/St. Martin’s, 2001
  • Ellen Cushman, “The Public Intellectual, Service Learning, and Activist Research,” Victor Villanueva, ed. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory, 2nd ed. Urbana/NCTE, 2003.
    Susan C. Jarratt, “Beside Ourselves: Rhetoric and Representation in Postcolonial Feminist Writing,” in Feminism and Composition: A Critical Sourcebook, Gesa E. Kirsch, et al., eds. Boston/St. Martin’s, 2003.
    Min-Zhan Lu, “Professing Multiculturalism: The Politics of Style in the Contact Zone,” Victor Villanueva, ed. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory, 2nd ed. Urbana/NCTE, 2003.
    Jonathon Mauk. “Location, Location, Location: The ‘Real’ (E)states of Being, Writing, and Thinking in Composition.” College English 65.4 (2003): 368-388.
  • Jim W. Corder, What I Learned at School,” in Lisa Ede, ed. On Writing Research: The Braddock Essays, 1975-1998. Boston/St. Martin’s, 1999.
    Arnetha Ball and Ted Lardner, “Dispositions toward Language: Teacher Constructs of Knowledge and the Ann Arbor Black English Case,” in Lisa Ede, ed. On Writing Research: The Braddock Essays, 1975-1998. Boston/St. Martin’s, 1999.
    Mary P. Hiatt, “The Feminine Style: Theory and Fact,” in Lisa Ede, ed. On Writing Research: The Braddock Essays, 1975-1998. Boston/St. Martin’s, 1999.
    Patricia Bizzell. “The Intellectual Work of ‘Mixed’ Forms of Academic Discourses.” Alt/Dis: Alternative Discourses and the Academy. Ed. Christopher Schroeder, Helen Fox, and Patricia Bizzell. Portsmouth: Boynton/Cook, 2002.
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